Epicoccum purpurascens

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Code: m14
Latin name: Epicoccum purpurascens
Source material: Spores and mycelium
Epicoccum has been isolated from cereals, fruits, polluted fresh water, compost beds, insects, human skin and sputum.

Allergen Exposure

Epicoccum is a secondary decomposer of plants, soil, paper and textiles. It is very common on dying substrates, where abundant sporulation can be observed. Small black pustules of E. purpurascens are frequently found on dead parts of numerous plants. It has also been isolated from cereals, fruits, polluted fresh water, compost beds, insects, human skin and sputum.

Clinical Experience

Lehrer et at. (1) report that in certain surveys, it is one of the most important sources of spores isolated outdoors. Chapman & Williams (2) reported that among the molds, Epicoccum showed the most positive reactions in skin testing of allergic patients from the Missouri, USA area. In one study (3) Epicoccum was found to be a frequent sensitizing agent in a Scandinavian population. Guilt (4) reported that a positive RAST was predictive for the outcome of bronchoprovocation response for Epicoccum.
 
Review
Epicoccum has worldwide distribution. It is a secondary decomposer of plants, soil, paper and textiles. It is very common on dying substrates, where abundant sporulation can be observed. Small black pustules of E. purpurascens are frequently found on dead parts of numerous plants. It has also been isolated from cereals, fruits, polluted fresh water, compost beds, insects, human skin and sputum. The conidia content of the atmosphere shows a clear maximum in calm, dry weather.
 
Lehrer et at. (1) report that in certain surveys, it is one of the most important sources of spores isolated outdoors. Chapman & Williams (2) reported that among the molds, Epicoccum showed the most positive reactions in skin testing of allergic patients from the Missouri, USA area. In one study (3) Epicoccum was found to be a frequent sensitizing agent in a Scandinavian population. Guilt (4) reported that a positive RAST was predictive for the outcome of bronchoprovocation response for Epicoccum.

References

  1. Lehrer SB, Aukrust L, Salvaggio JE. Respiratory allergy induced by fungi. Clinics in Chest Medicine 1983;4(l):23-41.
  2. Chapman JA, Williams S. Aeroallergens of the south-east Missouri area: a report of skin test frequencies and air sampling data. Ann Allergy 1985;24:411-8.
  3. Karlsson-Borgå Å, Jonsson P, Roffsen W. Specific IgE antibodies to 16 widespread mold genera in patients with suspected mold allergy. Ann Allergy 1989;63(12):521-6.
  4. Guill MF. Bronchial reactivity to Alternaria and Epicoccum antigens in asthmatic patients. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1984; (73):178. 

 

As in all diagnostic testing, the diagnosis is made by the physican based on both test results and the patient history.